How Would You Have Approached it?

Moderators: William Anderson, letumgo

How Would You Have Approached it?

Postby paparex » Sun Oct 02, 2011 1:37 am

I was fishing a small reservoir in Southern Idaho with Triploid Kamploops Fish was good and hard. Picked up a few with indicator and midges and a few more with a green apple colored leech. The caddis were hatching, the midges were hatching and the callibaetis were hatching. But the usual adults and emergers weren't working. As i pulled my boat up on shore near dark, I could see fish, large and small, working the open areas of the weed beds within 20 feet of the shoreline and in 4-6 feet of water. The little fish would fly completely out of the water and you could tell their size easily. For every 6 small fish a large 20+ inch would disturb the surface or would regularly and rhythmically "porpoise" the surface.

How would you approach the rising fish in the next 30 minutes of daylight? Floating line? Types of flies and presentations. The water was nearly still with an occasional chop from the wind.
paparex
 
Posts: 85
Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2010 4:16 pm
Location: Centerville, UT

Re: How Would You Have Approached it?

Postby Mike Connor » Sun Oct 02, 2011 4:08 am

Fish a team with a hatching "semi-dry" ( Deer hair or similar) caddis on the point, a callibaetis on the middle dropper, and a buzzer on the top dropper. Floating line. Leave the flies to drift with an occasional small twitch and keeping only loose contact. Keep your eyes on the floating fly. If it moves, disappears etc, then set the hook. You don't have much time to capitulate on such situations so it is best to have a few leaders set up appropriately which you can just change to suit. Although the rig will work into the darkness, it is then much harder to see the flies. You can increase the time by using a white fly. Suitable "indicator" flies;

Image

You can also use these in the same matter on fast moving water.

TL
MC
Mike Connor
 

Re: How Would You Have Approached it?

Postby Mike Connor » Sun Oct 02, 2011 7:52 am

Unfortunate typo there! "Capitulate = Capitalise"

TL
MC
Mike Connor
 

Re: How Would You Have Approached it?

Postby Ron Eagle Elk » Sun Oct 02, 2011 2:00 pm

Mike,

I just assumed you meant that the fish would be so big they would take your entire cast of flies when they broke you off. Grand technique.

REE
"A man may smile and bid you hale yet curse you to the devil, but when a good dog wags his tail he is always on the level"
User avatar
Ron Eagle Elk
 
Posts: 1375
Joined: Sun Feb 22, 2009 12:33 am
Location: Yelm, WA

Re: How Would You Have Approached it?

Postby willowhead » Sun Oct 02, 2011 2:49 pm

Cool flies.......... :D
Learn to see with your ears and hear with your eyes
CAUSE, it don't mean a thing, if it aint got that swing.....

http://www.pureartflytying.ning.com
User avatar
willowhead
 
Posts: 4465
Joined: Fri Oct 29, 2010 3:35 pm
Location: Roscoe, N.Y./Lakeview, Arkansas

Re: How Would You Have Approached it?

Postby skunkaroo » Tue Oct 04, 2011 12:53 pm

The technique Mike describes is called a washing line in the UK. The floating point fly is often a booby, but the flies Mike indicates would offer a more natural (and more palatable) silhouette.

Another option would be to use a floating line or midge tip with three "pulling flies". The bob fly (a bushy palmer or a muddler) would be your top dropper, the middle dropper would be a wet such as a soft Zulu or red tag, while your point would be a cruncher or smaller lightweight nymph. This set up is not fished static, but with a slow figure eight retrieve from an anchored boat. It works best with a ripple or light chop on the surface. The palmered flies are generally good stillwater caddis imitations, while the cruncher and/or nymph covers the mayfly/damselfly end of the spectrum.

Another option is to go with a straight floating line and three appropriately sized dry flies fished static, although for Kamloops rainbows, I think you would get better action with slightly submerged flies.

Here's a little something worth trying as a top dropper on a "pulling" cast (the top one has been a real performer for Kamloops rainbows):

Image

Image

Aaron
Aaron Laing, New Westminster BC
Moderator - FlyBC Flytying Forum
Stream Time Blog - Current Article: The Leggy Blond (Hawaiian bonefish pattern) (January 2011)
User avatar
skunkaroo
 
Posts: 388
Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2009 7:16 pm
Location: Southwest BC, Canada

Re: How Would You Have Approached it?

Postby William Anderson » Wed Oct 05, 2011 4:43 pm

Aaron, these are fantastic flies for such a purpose. Beautifully photographed as well.

w
"A man should not try to eliminate his complexes, but rather come into accord with them. They are ultimately what directs his conduct in the world." Sigmund Freud.
www.WilliamsFavorite.com
User avatar
William Anderson
Site Admin
 
Posts: 4387
Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2009 3:14 pm
Location: Ashburn, VA 20148

Re: How Would You Have Approached it?

Postby skunkaroo » Wed Oct 05, 2011 6:34 pm

Thanks. They're loosely based around some of the stuff I saw Davie McPhail tying. The first is a riff on the Dunkled wet fly, while the second follows a basic olive bumble or the like. I've tried adding some knotted pheasant tail legs to the first one, and we'll see if performs any better for the effort later this month.

Aaron
Aaron Laing, New Westminster BC
Moderator - FlyBC Flytying Forum
Stream Time Blog - Current Article: The Leggy Blond (Hawaiian bonefish pattern) (January 2011)
User avatar
skunkaroo
 
Posts: 388
Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2009 7:16 pm
Location: Southwest BC, Canada

Re: How Would You Have Approached it?

Postby letumgo » Wed Oct 05, 2011 6:44 pm

Aaron - Wonderful flies! They remind me a lot of some miniature muddler minnow variations I saw a couple years ago. They were tyed by Dave Wiltshire (http://davewiltshireflytying.blogspot.com/). Fran Better's used to tye miniature muddler minnows. He would trim off different parts of the fly, depending on what he wanted to imitate, or how he wanted the fly to fish. I think this would be an ideal feature for competition fishing.

http://www.flytyingforum.com/index.php?showtopic=45070&st=0&p=369528&hl=dwiltshire&fromsearch=1&#entry369528
http://www.flytyingforum.com/index.php?showtopic=45008&st=0&p=369075&hl=dwiltshire&fromsearch=1&#entry369075
http://davewiltshireflytying.blogspot.com/2009_01_01_archive.html
User avatar
letumgo
Site Admin
 
Posts: 9122
Joined: Sat Feb 21, 2009 7:55 pm
Location: Buffalo, New York

Re: How Would You Have Approached it?

Postby michaelgmcgraw » Wed Oct 05, 2011 7:05 pm

Muddled bumble, there's the muddled bibio. I think I've seen a bunch of the U.K. traditional lake flies tyed with a muddler heads.
michaelgmcgraw
 
Posts: 690
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2010 6:44 pm
Location: Liverpool N.Y

Next

Return to Fishing Wingless Wets

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests

cron