Search found 210 matches

by Greenwell
Fri Nov 13, 2020 10:32 pm
Forum: Fly Dressings - Winged Wet Flies
Topic: Mustad Catalog of Flies
Replies: 16
Views: 1245

Re: Mustad Catalog of Flies

Oddly enough, these are called "worm hooks" but weren't used for bait fishing, instead they were used to dress a pattern called the "Worm Fly". In Veniard's A Further Guide to Fly Dressing , 1964, the dressing is given on page 134 with this description: "This is another pattern which has come very m...
by Greenwell
Wed Oct 28, 2020 10:21 pm
Forum: Tying Wingless Wets
Topic: Can it get any worse?
Replies: 14
Views: 481

Re: Can it get any worse?

Worse? It bears no resemblance in color or form to any stage of the natural Ephemerella Subvaria whatsoever. Looks like another of those "This is my version of a (fill in the blank)" flies based on nothing more then the whim of some well meaning thread jocky with too much enthusiasm but too little o...
by Greenwell
Wed Oct 28, 2020 10:02 pm
Forum: Wet Fly Literature and History
Topic: Orvis Flymphs
Replies: 19
Views: 588

Re: Orvis Flymphs

These sets are very rare, besides the one I have, this is the only other intact set of Orvis Flymphs I've seen. What makes these especially interesting is how close to the original Pete Hidy Flymphs these are and the Orvis people went to some pains to maintain authenticity and accuracy of the dressi...
by Greenwell
Tue Aug 04, 2020 10:30 pm
Forum: Fishing Wingless Wets
Topic: Who Fishes Wood?
Replies: 38
Views: 2512

Re: Who Fishes Wood?

After several years of me badgering him to do so, Per Brandin is working on some 10' hollow built rods specifically for fishing Spiders. I've cast the first couple prototypes, one a 4 and the other a 5 and both will do the job with aplomb. However, Per called me last week saying that the second roun...
by Greenwell
Sun Apr 12, 2020 9:35 pm
Forum: Tying Wingless Wets
Topic: Edmonds & Lee
Replies: 17
Views: 2254

Re: Edmonds & Lee

Outside of the color descriptions in his printed patterns, Ronalds is unreliable as to color. The plates in the book were hand colored and through it's many editions from 1836 - 1913 the colors changed a fair amount. It is said that Ronalds himself colored the first 4 editions of the book. I have th...
by Greenwell
Sun Apr 12, 2020 8:54 pm
Forum: Tying Wingless Wets
Topic: Edmonds & Lee
Replies: 17
Views: 2254

Re: Edmonds & Lee

Actually, the link is to Alfred Ronald's book, "The Fly Fisher's Entomology" and not W.H. Aldam's "Quaint Treatise." Aldam wanted to chronicle the fly patterns found in an 18th century manuscript and provide actual specimens of both the flies and materials to dress them. His book described all 26 of...
by Greenwell
Sat Apr 11, 2020 8:36 pm
Forum: Tying Wingless Wets
Topic: Edmonds & Lee
Replies: 17
Views: 2254

Re: Edmonds & Lee

Apparently Walbran purchased some of Aldam’s estate including silk thread. In my copy of Aldam's Quaint Treatise the specimens of silk are quite different from Pearsalls, not only in color but in diameter. One silk is especially intriguing. The "Tailey Tail" fly calls for a dark fawn or fleshy colo...
by Greenwell
Mon Apr 06, 2020 8:21 pm
Forum: Wet Fly Literature and History
Topic: G E M Skues posting on Flymph Forum.
Replies: 9
Views: 2717

Re: G E M Skues posting on Flymph Forum.

I have that one. It contains a Skues style nymph tied by Johnson.
by Greenwell
Wed Feb 05, 2020 9:39 am
Forum: Tying Wingless Wets
Topic: North Country spider article
Replies: 138
Views: 12587

Re: North Country spider article

Now I know the true orgins of the "Friday night fish fries" that I so enjoy. After the potato was introduced to Europe circa 1570 - 1590, the inhabitants of the monasteries were divided into two groups depending upon their kitchen duties; Fish Friars and Chip Monks! Those with unusually fine culina...
by Greenwell
Tue Feb 04, 2020 8:39 pm
Forum: Tying Wingless Wets
Topic: North Country spider article
Replies: 138
Views: 12587

Re: North Country spider article

N01555_10.jpg Proof that Medieval Monks used standard angling techniques is shown here in the famous and delightful painting "Thursday" by British artist Walter Dendy Sadler. As can be clearly seen, the Brothers are fishing for tomorrow's fast-day dinner using tackle quite similar to that shown in ...