Search found 490 matches

by wsbailey
Fri Mar 13, 2020 4:19 pm
Forum: Soft Hackle Materials
Topic: Fresh New York city sidewalk kill
Replies: 34
Views: 726

Re: Fresh New York city sidewalk kill

You’re probably right. I also have a mouse skin. To me, the mouse fur looks like it would work best for very small flies.
by wsbailey
Fri Mar 13, 2020 3:52 pm
Forum: Soft Hackle Materials
Topic: Fresh New York city sidewalk kill
Replies: 34
Views: 726

Re: Fresh New York city sidewalk kill

Leisenring mentions field mouse, which I take to mean meadow vole, but doesn’t list it any of his patterns. The picture is of a small one that was caught in a mouse trap.
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4E60F189-E0EB-41B1-934F-524255971CBD.jpeg (488.15 KiB) Viewed 80 times
by wsbailey
Thu Mar 12, 2020 10:45 am
Forum: Soft Hackle Materials
Topic: Fresh New York city sidewalk kill
Replies: 34
Views: 726

Re: Fresh New York city sidewalk kill

Eric Leiser helped popularize woodchuck for fly tying. I use to be semi-addicted to picking up roadkill. I found a cure when a trapper offered to send me some (whole frozen) woodchuck. Unfortunately, he sent me the wrong package. It contained two frozen baby goats. The trapper told me to toss them. ...
by wsbailey
Mon Mar 02, 2020 12:32 pm
Forum: Fly Dressings - Wingless Wets
Topic: Tai Chi Kebari
Replies: 8
Views: 225

Re: Tai Chi Kebari

I read that book years ago and found the stream of consciousness very unzen like. Another book from that era, "Trout Fishing in America", is not about trout fishing.
by wsbailey
Mon Feb 24, 2020 11:57 am
Forum: Tying Wingless Wets
Topic: North Country spider article
Replies: 138
Views: 4380

Re: North Country spider article

All of these dyes are the most stable. Madder, woad (European indigo), weld. English oak bark and brazilwood. Brazilwood was being imported into Europe from Asia by the Middle Ages. The S. American country was named after brazilwood. So much Brazilian brazilwood was harvested that now the Asian vers...
by wsbailey
Mon Feb 24, 2020 12:02 am
Forum: Tying Wingless Wets
Topic: North Country spider article
Replies: 138
Views: 4380

Re: North Country spider article

In Alfred Ronalds' "The Fly-Fisher's Entomology" he speaks of using German wool in some of his fly patterns. I'm fairly certain that he was referring to Berlin wool.
by wsbailey
Sun Feb 23, 2020 11:20 pm
Forum: Tying Wingless Wets
Topic: North Country spider article
Replies: 138
Views: 4380

Re: North Country spider article

Ray, There no dumb questions: only dumb answers. The main purpose for the Berlin wool is to tie Spey flies. Around 1840 ; Berlin wool work became a big fad and that was the same era as Spey flies. Synthetic dyes weren't discovered until 1856 so originally, Berlin wool yarn was dyed with natural dyes...
by wsbailey
Sun Feb 23, 2020 9:34 pm
Forum: Tying Wingless Wets
Topic: North Country spider article
Replies: 138
Views: 4380

Re: North Country spider article

I thought I would take a chance and show a picture of the yarn that I dyed with dyes available in the Middle Ages. They had a very limited number of dye colors. The Bayeux tapestry used eight colors.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bayeux_Tapestry
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by wsbailey
Thu Feb 20, 2020 10:50 am
Forum: Tying Wingless Wets
Topic: North Country spider article
Replies: 138
Views: 4380

Re: North Country spider article

So where could a fly tyer of the Middle Ages have found his wool. Probably lots of places but in "A World of Insects" we learn that the word caddisfly comes from: "caddice men of the middle ages - itinerant salesmen that attached the pieces of yarn, cloth, and ribbons that they sold to their coats. ...