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Re: Tups Indespensible nymph

Posted: Mon Jan 07, 2019 3:51 pm
by William Anderson
upstatetrout wrote:
Mon Jan 07, 2019 1:45 pm
P_20181231_093031.jpg

Thank you every one for your critiques and observations. William your observation that the tails in Leisenrings book were Hackle tips is correct. I completely missed that when tying the fly the first time. The blend of seals fur is as it is described in the book.For the body I used gossamer doubled and twisted as I do not have that color in button hole. I have no idea why Leisenring referred to this pattern as a nymph but it is as he described . Again thank you all for commenting I really appreciate it.

Tom
This is such a nice example of this pattern. It's a small detail, but I really like the size and shagginess of that thorax. When I'm on my game that's the way I prefer them to turn out. It doesn't always happen. :D

Re: Tups Indespensible nymph

Posted: Mon Jan 07, 2019 3:57 pm
by William Anderson
tie2fish wrote:
Mon Jan 07, 2019 2:21 pm
William Anderson wrote:
Mon Jan 07, 2019 12:58 pm
Carl's correct that the rear is buttonhole twist, which is a size D silk, ... " [quote}


Tups Flymph.jpg
Bill, this is a quintessential tie for me. It's impeccably constructed and clearly reads more like a sulphur dun than a nymph pattern. Since I fish this pattern during a sulphur hatch I like the longer hackle and tail fibers. One of the odd shifts that comes from translating a UK pattern to Eastern US water.

Re: Tups Indespensible nymph

Posted: Mon Jan 07, 2019 6:59 pm
by tie2fish
William Anderson wrote:
Mon Jan 07, 2019 3:57 pm
tie2fish wrote:
Mon Jan 07, 2019 2:21 pm
William Anderson wrote:
Mon Jan 07, 2019 12:58 pm
Carl's correct that the rear is buttonhole twist, which is a size D silk, ... " [quote}


Tups Flymph.jpg
Bill, this is a quintessential tie for me. It's impeccably constructed and clearly reads more like a sulphur dun than a nymph pattern. Since I fish this pattern during a sulphur hatch I like the longer hackle and tail fibers. One of the odd shifts that comes from translating a UK pattern to Eastern US water.
Thanks, W. I should have mentioned that I posted this photo to show the Gudebrod "D" rod winding thread abdomen, not as an example of a Tups nymph per se.