Isonychia Beaver (Tutorial)

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michaelgmcgraw
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Re: Isonychia Beaver

Post by michaelgmcgraw » Sun Jan 02, 2011 3:09 pm

I use a lot of Mad River dubbing and Hare line. Mad River has some nice shades (is that a plug er wot) .
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Re: Isonychia Beaver

Post by letumgo » Sun Jan 02, 2011 3:12 pm

Ruard - Unfortunately I do not have a picture of the Isonychia to post, but here is a website that has fantastic reference photos of the Isonychia bicolor nymph (http://www.troutnut.com/specimen/477). Your question makes me want to go back to the vice and create a more accurate version.
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Re: Isonychia Beaver

Post by William Anderson » Sun Jan 02, 2011 3:22 pm

Ray, that is lovely. I'm wondering what method of presentation to you intend for this fly? I've used some large dark nymph isonychia patterns on the bottom with some success. (on brookies in WV...does that even count?) given that the iso nymph crawls to the edge and hatches like a stonefly, do you take these for the odd nymph dislodged and floating downstream.

that troutnut link is absolutely invaluable.

w
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Re: Isonychia Beaver

Post by willowhead » Sun Jan 02, 2011 3:31 pm

The master strickes again.......KILLER flies Ray. Absolutely ass kickin' KILLER. i love Mad River dubbings.....been usin' their stuff for years.....and Hareline too......their Haretron kills. It's Rabbitt and antron blended.
Dog, the first thing i thought of was Connovers.........when i saw Ray's flies. i did Conovers for a swap Peggy Brenner hosted on another site maybe a year ago.....blended my own dubbing using Muskrat and Red wool.....came out great. Joe's stuff is the best. He does everything according to the book.....i mean traditionally, so if that's what your after, there is no better source.
If you do blend your own.....make sure of two things. Just cut the little pieces of red wool very small.....no more than a quarter inch, and never run the blender for long spins.....just very short little bust at a time, and check each time to see if you've got it. ;)
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Ruard
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Re: Isonychia Beaver

Post by Ruard » Sun Jan 02, 2011 4:25 pm

letumgo wrote:Ruard - Unfortunately I do not have a picture of the Isonychia to post, but here is a website that has fantastic reference photos of the Isonychia bicolor nymph (http://www.troutnut.com/specimen/477). Your question makes me want to go back to the vice and create a more accurate version.
Thanks Ray. Curious about that more accurate version.


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Re: Isonychia Beaver

Post by letumgo » Sun Jan 02, 2011 4:39 pm

Ruard - Your question about the natural insect lead me back to the vice. Once I had a photo of the natural insect I just had to try for a better imitation. Here is my attempt (nymph style). Most fly patterns call for a white line down the back, but the photo seems to suggest a golden color, which is why I chose to use gold silk.
2011_0102_171229A.JPG
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2011_0102_170855B.JPG
2011_0102_170855B.JPG (84.08 KiB) Viewed 3769 times
Isonychia Nymph
Hook - Daiichi Model 1710 (Size 12)
Thread - Pearsall's Napels Silk (Antique Gold /31)
Tail - Burnt Turkey Tail Fibers (Natural)
Lateral Line - Twisted Dubbing Loop formed using the tying silk (tyed in at both ends and the middle)
Body - Beaver Dubbing (Isonychia color)
Legs - Burnt Turkey Tail Fibers (Natural)
Head - Pearsall's Napels Silk (Antique Gold /31) - darken top side with a brown sharpie to complete the fly. The photo was taken before I darkened the head of the fly.

Notes About the Pattern Design:
The Isonychia bicolor nymph is noted to be a very powerful swimmer. For this reason, I tyed the fly with a longer tail, in hopes that it will allow greater movement of the fly in the water. I know the natural insect only has three tail fibers, but I haven't met a fish who can count, so I ignored this fact.

The tail and legs are all formed using natural turkey tail, which has been "burnt" in a dilute bleach solution to remove the tiny barbules that hold the fibers together. I chose this material since it had similar markings to the natural insect (mottled) and it had a similar shape (wide flattened) to their legs. I clipped off the fine ends of the fibers to get the width I wanted. The legs were formed by tying in the turkey tail fibers by the thin end (to allow greater movement).

I noticed that the tail fibers have a bit of a red cast to them and the head of the fly is dark like the body. Once the fly was finished I added these colors with sharpie markers. You can fine-tune the color combination based on local insects.

The lateral line is formed by making a dubbing loop using the tying thread. To form the lateral line, I dubbed the rear half of the body of the fly and then twisted the silk dubbing loop into a tight cord and pulled it over the back of the fly. Tye the dubbing loop in at the middle and then pull it back out of the way while you form the front half of the fly. Once the thorax and legs are all in place, twist the dubbing loop and pull it over the front half of the body. Secure the dubbing loop and then whip finish a head.

I think the body of the fly needs to be just a bit plumper. The natural insect appears to have more of a plump cigar shaped body. The body shape can easily be adjusted by forming an underbody, or using a bit more dubbing.

(Credit for the Isonychia bicolor photo & Kudos go to Jason Neuswanger a.k.a. "Troutnut"/Source: http://www.troutnut.com/specimen/477)
picture_1589_medium (Troutnut - Jason Neuswanger).jpg
picture_1589_medium (Troutnut - Jason Neuswanger).jpg (67.75 KiB) Viewed 3781 times
Troutnut has a great video of the Isonychia nymph swimming around (Click on the link and then scroll down to the middle of the page - http://www.troutnut.com/videos)
Last edited by letumgo on Sun Jan 02, 2011 5:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Isonychia Beaver

Post by hankaye » Sun Jan 02, 2011 5:16 pm

Ray, Howdy;

"SHAAAZAAAAM".... (Pfc. Gomer Pyle)
Downright fantastic..
hank
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of consecutive days I've stayed alive." George Carlin
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Re: Isonychia Beaver

Post by letumgo » Sun Jan 02, 2011 5:22 pm

Well GOLLY! Thanks Sarge. :D
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Re: Isonychia Beaver

Post by Ruard » Sun Jan 02, 2011 7:02 pm

You really picked the glove from the wall:very well done!!

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Re: Isonychia Beaver

Post by willowhead » Sun Jan 02, 2011 7:03 pm

SURPRISE! SURPRISE! SURPRISE! :D

Ray, i've wayched no less than a dozen different tyers (probably closer to 2 dozen) do their version of an Isonychia, wether it be the dun, emerger or nymph.....and your nymph is fantastic. Most recipes don't call for the stripe to go all the way through (over the wing case) to the head.....but you pretty closely matched the natural in the pic there. Very well done. i've seen some pretty incredable things done with filo (philo?) pluembs, or after shafts, to insinuate the gills.....but it's a lot of work winding (wraping), the dubbing through the little tiny fibers alah Matuka style, all the way the length of the abdomen, using a bodkin to seperate spaces for the wraps. In the Catskills an Isonychia Dun is also known as a Slate Drake, and the wings are a light greyish color, often imitated using poly yarn for a post and done Parachute style. Teal flank feather makes for a nice devided wing, if your going to hackle (med. Dun), the traditional Catskill style. ;)

please tell me the Bears have at least tied the game......... :roll:
Learn to see with your ears and hear with your eyes
CAUSE, it don't mean a thing, if it aint got that swing.....

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