Fresh New York city sidewalk kill

Moderators: William Anderson, letumgo

User avatar
Theroe
Posts: 1072
Joined: Sat Feb 25, 2017 11:42 pm
Location: New York City

Re: Fresh New York city sidewalk kill

Post by Theroe » Thu Mar 12, 2020 7:24 am

dd
Fun fact number five: I pick up just about every dead critter I come across...... Eric Leiser published a book about fly tying materials which I purchased decades ago. Ever since then, I never pass a good roadkill!

Ask William.....

Dana
Soft and wet - the only way....
Variant
Posts: 84
Joined: Sun Jun 30, 2019 10:23 am

Re: Fresh New York city sidewalk kill

Post by Variant » Thu Mar 12, 2020 9:18 am

Theroe wrote:
Thu Mar 12, 2020 7:24 am
dd
Fun fact number five: I pick up just about every dead critter I come across...... Eric Leiser published a book about fly tying materials which I purchased decades ago. Ever since then, I never pass a good roadkill!

Ask William.....

Dana
Dana,
I also have FLY-TYING MATERIALS by Eric Leiser…… I refer to it often.
There are also many really good fly patterns in Eric’s book.
Eric changed the way I looked at roadkills also.

Lou
In sport,method is everything.The more the skill the method calls for,the higher it’s yield of emotional stir and satisfaction,the higher it’s place must be in a sportsman’s scale of values. RODERICK HAIG-BROWN
wsbailey
Posts: 777
Joined: Fri Feb 27, 2009 6:30 pm
Location: Fort Wayne Indiana

Re: Fresh New York city sidewalk kill

Post by wsbailey » Thu Mar 12, 2020 10:45 am

Eric Leiser helped popularize woodchuck for fly tying. I use to be semi-addicted to picking up roadkill. I found a cure when a trapper offered to send me some (whole frozen) woodchuck. Unfortunately, he sent me the wrong package. It contained two frozen baby goats. The trapper told me to toss them. Unfortunately, it was the day after trash pickup day. Even after wrapping the goats in multiple layers; they soon began to stink to high heaven. It was a long week waiting for the next trash day. The smell lingered for some time after that. Later on, the frozen woodchuck arrived. Fourteen in all! Fortunately, the whole episode didn’t cost me any money; only a lot of grief. I think I could still be tempted by a meadow vole though.
User avatar
Theroe
Posts: 1072
Joined: Sat Feb 25, 2017 11:42 pm
Location: New York City

Re: Fresh New York city sidewalk kill

Post by Theroe » Thu Mar 12, 2020 12:01 pm

Variant wrote:
Thu Mar 12, 2020 9:18 am
Theroe wrote:
Thu Mar 12, 2020 7:24 am
dd
Fun fact number five: I pick up just about every dead critter I come across...... Eric Leiser published a book about fly tying materials which I purchased decades ago. Ever since then, I never pass a good roadkill!

Ask William.....

Dana
Dana,
I also have FLY-TYING MATERIALS by Eric Leiser…… I refer to it often.
There are also many really good fly patterns in Eric’s book.
Eric changed the way I looked at roadkills also.

Lou
I personally liked Eric Leiser-that particular book of his is mandatory reading for any serious Flyfisher/fly tyer.

At the end of the book he lists the condor nymph as one of his favorite patterns. I still tie and fish that pattern to this day, albeit with a partridge hackle wound collar style in front. It is deadly......
Soft and wet - the only way....
Variant
Posts: 84
Joined: Sun Jun 30, 2019 10:23 am

Re: Fresh New York city sidewalk kill

Post by Variant » Thu Mar 12, 2020 6:15 pm

Theroe wrote:
Thu Mar 12, 2020 12:01 pm
Variant wrote:
Thu Mar 12, 2020 9:18 am
Theroe wrote:
Thu Mar 12, 2020 7:24 am
dd
Fun fact number five: I pick up just about every dead critter I come across...... Eric Leiser published a book about fly tying materials which I purchased decades ago. Ever since then, I never pass a good roadkill!

Ask William.....

Dana
Dana,
I also have FLY-TYING MATERIALS by Eric Leiser…… I refer to it often.
There are also many really good fly patterns in Eric’s book.
Eric changed the way I looked at roadkills also.

Lou
I personally liked Eric Leiser-that particular book of his is mandatory reading for any serious Flyfisher/fly tyer.

At the end of the book he lists the condor nymph as one of his favorite patterns. I still tie and fish that pattern to this day, albeit with a partridge hackle wound collar style in front. It is deadly......
I have fished the variant (wingless dry fly) since the early 80s with good success, very easy tie.
Lou
In sport,method is everything.The more the skill the method calls for,the higher it’s yield of emotional stir and satisfaction,the higher it’s place must be in a sportsman’s scale of values. RODERICK HAIG-BROWN
Mike62
Posts: 377
Joined: Mon Aug 06, 2018 3:50 pm
Location: Northern Maine

Re: Fresh New York city sidewalk kill

Post by Mike62 » Fri Mar 13, 2020 9:11 am

I really enjoyed the vision of Dana walking through Penn Station, eyes glued to the concrete, searching for 'roadkill'. It sounds like a scene from "The Wind in the Willows": Dana of Toad Hall (Manhattan), filling his many pocketed coat with furry little corpses.

I passed a dead moose on the way into Caribou this morning and thought of Dana gleefully trying to stuff the poor thing into an empty pocket.
User avatar
tups
Posts: 31
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2009 4:31 pm

Re: Fresh New York city sidewalk kill

Post by tups » Fri Mar 13, 2020 9:39 am

“Tell me about the rabbits George.”
User avatar
Theroe
Posts: 1072
Joined: Sat Feb 25, 2017 11:42 pm
Location: New York City

Re: Fresh New York city sidewalk kill

Post by Theroe » Fri Mar 13, 2020 3:23 pm

Mike62 wrote:
Fri Mar 13, 2020 9:11 am
I really enjoyed the vision of Dana walking through Penn Station, eyes glued to the concrete, searching for 'roadkill'. It sounds like a scene from "The Wind in the Willows": Dana of Toad Hall (Manhattan), filling his many pocketed coat with furry little corpses.

I passed a dead moose on the way into Caribou this morning and thought of Dana gleefully trying to stuff the poor thing into an empty pocket.
Ha!
On MORE than one occasion, I have picked up dead critters in front of clients. Last year I was on the roof of Madison Square Garden (which is a big flat circle) with only a few exhaust fan vent hoods on it...... I was up therelooking at a job to do for them: and lo and behold there were two dead flickers right next to one of the exhaust fans :shock: :shock: without hesitation I bent over to pick both of them up and stuff them into my inside suit jacket pocket..... The one woman who was there with us was absolutely horrified. If I could’ve taken a picture of her face I could’ve put it on Instagram and I would’ve gone viral with 5 million views.
Me, being the extreme quick thinker that I am, said “glad I saw those dead birds ..... I had to pick them up, so the smell wouldn’t go down the air intake and bother any of the patrons“.. :geek:
She approves.
And Yes I was awarded the project.....
Soft and wet - the only way....
wsbailey
Posts: 777
Joined: Fri Feb 27, 2009 6:30 pm
Location: Fort Wayne Indiana

Re: Fresh New York city sidewalk kill

Post by wsbailey » Fri Mar 13, 2020 3:52 pm

Leisenring mentions field mouse, which I take to mean meadow vole, but doesn’t list it any of his patterns. The picture is of a small one that was caught in a mouse trap.
4E60F189-E0EB-41B1-934F-524255971CBD.jpeg
4E60F189-E0EB-41B1-934F-524255971CBD.jpeg (488.15 KiB) Viewed 904 times
User avatar
Theroe
Posts: 1072
Joined: Sat Feb 25, 2017 11:42 pm
Location: New York City

Re: Fresh New York city sidewalk kill

Post by Theroe » Fri Mar 13, 2020 4:15 pm

wsbailey wrote:
Fri Mar 13, 2020 3:52 pm
Leisenring mentions field mouse, which I take to mean meadow vole, but doesn’t list it any of his patterns. The picture is of a small one that was caught in a mouse trap.

4E60F189-E0EB-41B1-934F-524255971CBD.jpeg
Where I live in New Jersey, we have both field mice and woodland voles. The woodland voles that I have trapped down here are Very close to water rat - Rob Smith had a small piece that he let me look at the last fly tying symposium. I also use Field-mouse quite a bit, it is an excellent light dubbing.I also use Fieldmouse quite a bit, it is an excellent light dubbing
Dana
Soft and wet - the only way....
Post Reply