Quill-slip wings vs. Dabbler-type wings

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Blueback
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Quill-slip wings vs. Dabbler-type wings

Post by Blueback » Wed Aug 22, 2018 8:27 pm

I'm not sure if I've got the names right, but what are the main differences between these two types of winged wet flies...other than the parts/types of feathers being used for the wings? I guess I'm interested in which is more traditional? Is one more common than the other in the world of winged wet flies? Do you folks prefer one over the other? Has either type proven to be a more effective trout catcher than the other? Thanks ahead of time for any responses. I like hearing from the experts! I realize this is in Fishing "Wingless" Wets, but I couldn't figure out where else to post it.... Sorry if I messed up.
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Theroe
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Re: Quill-slip wings vs. Dabbler-type wings

Post by Theroe » Thu Aug 23, 2018 5:33 pm

Maybe the “winged wet” topic might be better?
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Smuggler
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Re: Quill-slip wings vs. Dabbler-type wings

Post by Smuggler » Wed Aug 29, 2018 2:36 pm

Hey Blueback,

Good question for sure. Dabbler wings are interesting for sure, not a style of winging used in the US a lot. It's mainly for fishing wet flies tandem style and pulling them through bubble lines in lough (lake) fishing instances.

Dabbler wings are tied in 4 sections with small slips of Bronze Mallard flank being the material of choice. A good way to practice these wings is to use mallard flank. Sort out 4 separate slips and start by tying the top one in first with two turns, do the same thing with the remainder of the slips around the circumference of the shank making sure to only use two turns for each tie in point.

The two turns thing makes it easy to keep track if you need to back your thread off and re-do any of the wings. It also keeps thread buildup to a minimum. Another key here is to wax your thread for superior grip.


Quill slips are often associated with what I call "Standard American Wet flies". Flies that were first published by Ray Bergman in his book, Trout. Gaudy things. With that being said,there are many traditional Scottish/English/Irish patterns that used quill slips well before Bergman.

The best way to get these to set is to first perfect your body. If you body isn't perfect, your wings will never set right. What I mean by that is to have a slight taper when you build your body abruptly ends, creating a sharp drop off. This is where your quill slips wings will be seated. That fat end of the tapered body will hold your wing in place when you tighten up to set the wing. Waxing your thread is key here as well.


I don't (and doubt anyone else does) use dabbler wings for winged wets... to answer your question! :)
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redietz
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Re: Quill-slip wings vs. Dabbler-type wings

Post by redietz » Wed Aug 29, 2018 4:21 pm

Smuggler wrote:
Wed Aug 29, 2018 2:36 pm

Quill slips are often associated with what I call "Standard American Wet flies". Flies that were first published by Ray Bergman in his book, Trout.
Long before that, of course. Think Mary Orvis Marbury and Favorite Flies. (And most of those patterns had been published before that.)
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Re: Quill-slip wings vs. Dabbler-type wings

Post by Smuggler » Thu Aug 30, 2018 7:17 am

True enough Bob! My apologies.
wsbailey
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Re: Quill-slip wings vs. Dabbler-type wings

Post by wsbailey » Thu Aug 30, 2018 9:23 am

Dabblers are Irish lake flies. The wing in this video looks to me like a standard bronze mallard wet fly wing.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=you ... koBKcbtp4k
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Re: Quill-slip wings vs. Dabbler-type wings

Post by UC Steve » Sun Sep 02, 2018 12:45 am

Interesting question. I tie a lot of Dabblers & find them killing as stream flies meant for swinging. The term 'lough' or 'loch' fly is misleading, as the design frame is used extensively as a stream fly in Ireland, & tied in all sizes, from wee flies to Atlantic salmon patterns. They are tied both wingless & winged -- matched wings & also clump winged. Not a style we often see in the U.S., but gaining popularity as a Trout Spey design.
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Re: Quill-slip wings vs. Dabbler-type wings

Post by wsbailey » Sun Sep 02, 2018 7:13 am

Bronze mallard wet fly wings might have been the better term since the question really wasn't about dabblers but a style of wing.
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Re: Quill-slip wings vs. Dabbler-type wings

Post by UC Steve » Sun Sep 02, 2018 2:38 pm

Which wing style is better? One fish into it the wing becomes a clump-style regardless how you dress it...

Might have to ask the trout (fun research), because, considering all the nuances of a day on the water, I for one can't tell the difference.

Easier for me to make a comparison on the effectiveness of a dabbler style wetfly vs. the 'traditional' paired quill wing style. The dabbler with more built-in pulse & movement a noticeably more effective bait, overall.
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Re: Quill-slip wings vs. Dabbler-type wings

Post by Blueback » Sun Sep 02, 2018 7:28 pm

Thanks for confirming my thinking on the dabbler/bronze mallard wing-type, UC Steve -- that they're very effective stream flies when swinging. I think I'll have to tie up a few this fall after all...and give them a try on some searuns. Are there any patterns that any of you would suggest as favorites? Appreciating all the feedback....
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