Yorkshire Spider (Shaner Collection)

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Yorkshire Spider (Shaner Collection)

Post by ForumGhillie » Fri Jul 20, 2018 5:53 pm

I have been exploring the FlymphForum for a couple of evenings as time permits. Last night I came upon this wonderful forum thread... http://www.flymphforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=5983 about Yorkshire Spiders with photos by Ray of John Shaner's collection and Shaner's description.

My we brain is always thinking fishing and solutions to my past fishing excursions. I just don't tie for the sake of tying anymore, i tie to solve a fishing problem.

When out West I love to fish the Trico hatch and spinner falls on flat water with big, elusive trout sipping in these tiny morsels. While my spinner and dun patterns are fairly effective it is an emerger pattern that escapes me at the start of the hatch. Obviously, I could ignore this stage and tie on a dun and still be happy, but that is not in my nature. Every year out West I accept the challenge and get humbled with my latest creations.

So... after studying the Yorkshire Spiders which also seem to be tied to imitate different small aquatic insects I decided tonight to test this new creation idea. Although I think it might work trailing behind a floating dun pattern for visibility and eye tracking I began to really appreciate those master tiers tying these extremely small Yorkshire Spider patterns without all the tools we have today.

Yes, I am getting older and my eyesight is not anywhere near what it was but even with today's tools combined with Pearsall's silk thread and tiny bird feathers it gives me a real, sincere appreciation for the old time tiers.

This quick iPhone photo I took is tied on a TMC #2488 size #18 hook. I definitely need more practice.

Image
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Re: Yorkshire Spider (Shaner Collection)

Post by hankaye » Fri Jul 20, 2018 6:06 pm

WiFlyfisher, Howdy;

Now ain't that just the cutest wee bitty bug :D .

Can't wait till you give us an 'After action report'.

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Re: Yorkshire Spider (Shaner Collection)

Post by narcodog » Fri Jul 20, 2018 8:00 pm

John, now that's what I was talkin about. Discussions such as this have been lost along the way.
Last edited by narcodog on Fri Jul 20, 2018 10:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Yorkshire Spider (Shaner Collection)

Post by Bazzer69 » Fri Jul 20, 2018 8:11 pm

Maybe technically not the best Fly in the world, but it WILL catch fish.
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Re: Yorkshire Spider (Shaner Collection)

Post by ForumGhillie » Fri Jul 20, 2018 10:04 pm

Bazzer69 wrote:Maybe technically not the best Fly in the world, but it WILL catch fish.
Bazza
I am glad you mentioned that. I can't see those tiny wraps any more like I used to when tying tiny size #20 flies. I often hold a fly in my hand and admire how wonderful it looks, but when I I take a macro shot of it I see all my micro flaws. I learned a long time ago it only matters what the trout think. Some of Shaner's Yorkshire fly patterns have the hackle clipped, which might have shocked some fly tiers. Those flies may not sell in a fly shop but I believe the trout would and did approve.

I think we often get so hung up on what fly fishermen will think of a pattern rather than what the trout will find acceptable. I started tying with scraps when I was twelve and I caught trout, not often but the flies worked okay. Today, we often times see online the perfectly tied flies yet they are usually not the most effective.
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Re: Yorkshire Spider (Shaner Collection)

Post by Bazzer69 » Sat Jul 21, 2018 12:27 am

I know what you mean about eyesight. I have a very defective left eye and astigmatism in my right eye. On top of that I’ve got glycoma. But solder on, my flies are not so great but I tie plenty that manage to fool a fish or two. I was once told that a fly is like a impressionistic painting, it can appear to be many things when looked at by a fish!
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Re: Yorkshire Spider (Shaner Collection)

Post by ForumGhillie » Sat Jul 21, 2018 5:16 am

Waking up early and trying to get better at a new Trico pattern using the Yorkshire Spider design as my template.

John Shaner mentioned in the original post that I referenced earlier: "Another thing to notice is the tie-off point is at the end of the body rather than behind the hackle or at the head in the conventional manner. A very neat and convenient method of finishing a thread bodied Spider."

Image

So I had to try this, it makes you really think about every wrap and placement of material. I added peacock herl at the head first, then the starling and finished with the silk thread body. I don't have all the colors of Pearsall's Gossamer silk so I darkened my light olive silk with a Prismacolor pen.

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Re: Yorkshire Spider (Shaner Collection)

Post by tie2fish » Sat Jul 21, 2018 7:28 am

We will be most interested in hearing how that works, John. I think we often get sidetracked in our tying by the idea that our fishing flies need to be macro perfect. I have noticed more than a few times while fishing that the fuzzy profile and scruffy hackle of a well chewed fly has proved to be an effective catcher -- frequently more so than a new one fresh out of my vest.
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Re: Yorkshire Spider (Shaner Collection)

Post by Tom Smithwick » Sat Jul 21, 2018 9:08 am

I have had very good luck on highly pressured fish by using a simple size 20 pheasant tail during a trico spinner fall. One fiber for the body + couple turns of blue dun or cream hackle. The hatches in PA start in early July and continue until the first hard frost. At first, the fish will take the standard fully dressed patterns, but after a couple weeks, sparser patterns, including the soft hackle fished just under the surface work better. It's a humbling experience to have a perfectly good floating pattern on an 8X tippet drift harmlessly through a pod of voraciously feeding fish time after time, but it happens. Try the soft hackle then just under the surface, and also after the fall and surface feeding is over put on a tiny split shot and fish it deeper. I would not doubt that a simple silk and hackle fly would work fine as well, and I would not hesitate to play around a bit with colors like cream, pale olive, black, etc.
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Re: Yorkshire Spider (Shaner Collection)

Post by ForumGhillie » Sat Jul 21, 2018 9:30 am

Tom Smithwick wrote:I have had very good luck on highly pressured fish by using a simple size 20 pheasant tail during a trico spinner fall. One fiber for the body + couple turns of blue dun or cream hackle. The hatches in PA start in early July and continue until the first hard frost. At first, the fish will take the standard fully dressed patterns, but after a couple weeks, sparser patterns, including the soft hackle fished just under the surface work better. It's a humbling experience to have a perfectly good floating pattern on an 8X tippet drift harmlessly through a pod of voraciously feeding fish time after time, but it happens. Try the soft hackle then just under the surface, and also after the fall and surface feeding is over put on a tiny split shot and fish it deeper. I would not doubt that a simple silk and hackle fly would work fine as well, and I would not hesitate to play around a bit with colors like cream, pale olive, black, etc.
Tom thank you for your insights.

The spinnerfall is my favorite time and I have a deadly style dry I always use. It is normally more about timing and getting your fly right in front of them when they are gulping in a clump of spinners. Plus, I find they tend to move upstream, downstream and slide to the left and right. So when I cast thinking I got them this time they all of a sudden appear a few inches away from my fly.

I love the hatch and the spinnerfall and it can be very humbling at times, especially the very selective bank feeders. The trout I am casting to will take you into your backing and drag you into the weeds. Getting the big trout to the net is never an easy task.

I made this short video a couple of years ago... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jGMr-ex_OVM. (I reference wiflyfisher.com at the end only because people steal stuff online all the time.)

I have heard from another friend that after the hatch try a drowned Trico. Tom, I will keep your suggestion in mind. Although, what usually kills the spinnerfall is the dang Western mountain wind!


Note: I just want to point out my above patterns are not a true Yorkshire Spider, nor am I saying they are. My hook, body to hackle proportions are not correct, nor are my flies tied exactly in the same fashion.
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