Flymphs

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raven4ns
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Flymphs

Post by raven4ns » Thu Jul 18, 2019 10:44 am

Hello,
Recently I discovered that I had the wrong perception of Flymphs as compared to soft hackle flies. To help me correct this misconception may I pose a couple of questions to the forum? Do all flymphs have tails/no tails which differentiates it from a generic soft hackle fly? Do Flymphs have a thorax/no thorax which separates it from other soft hackles? How can you tell a Flymph from other soft hackles?
I want to start tying up some Flymphs, based on the correct interpretation, that I feel will work here in Nova Scotia. If any of the members that fish Eastern streams would give me their most productive Flymph I suspect it would work here in Nova Scotia. I hope this isn't too much of an imposition as it would be most helpful. In all my years fishing in Nova Scotia I have never come across a fisherman using soft hackle flies let alone Flymphs. Thank you.
All the best,

Tim
https://www.flickr.com/photos/44673530@N04/
The measure of a man is not how many times he gets knocked down, but how many times he gets back up.
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letumgo
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Re: Flymphs

Post by letumgo » Thu Jul 18, 2019 11:45 am

To me, the defining characteristic of a flymph, is the body of the fly. In general, Flymph bodies are have natural fur dubbing, which is spun on a waxed silk core (sometimes referred to a Leisenring-style spun body). If you look thru the tutorial section of this website, you can find many tutorials (pictorial and video links) illustrating the process.

The tyer has complete control of the dubbing (color, density) and underlying thread color. The process allows the tyer to tailor their patterns to match the color and size of the insect they are targeting.

The magic with flymphs happens when they are fished. When the fly gets wet, the underlying silk core becomes visible thru the spiky dubbing of the body. This color of the silk can be an important part of the overall appearance of the fly.

IMO flymphs can have tails, or be tail-less. They may be single color, or multiple colors. Some tyers keep the hackle at the front of the thorax, while others spiral the hackle thru the thorax region.

I would recommend picking up a copy of the "Art of the Wet Fly" (Leisenring/Hidy), and searching thru this site, and Carl Sanders (Old Hat) website.
Ray (letumgo)----<°))))))><
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raven4ns
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Re: Flymphs

Post by raven4ns » Thu Jul 18, 2019 1:04 pm

Thank you, Ray, I appreciate your explanation. This will certainly help me understand Flymphs much better than I obviously did. Thank you as well for the link.
All the best,

Tim
https://www.flickr.com/photos/44673530@N04/
The measure of a man is not how many times he gets knocked down, but how many times he gets back up.
Trifly
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Re: Flymphs

Post by Trifly » Fri Jul 19, 2019 1:01 pm

letumgo wrote:
Thu Jul 18, 2019 11:45 am
To me, the defining characteristic of a flymph, is the body of the fly. In general, Flymph bodies are have natural fur dubbing, which is spun on a waxed silk core (sometimes referred to a Leisenring-style spun body). If you look thru the tutorial section of this website, you can find many tutorials (pictorial and video links) illustrating the process.

The tyer has complete control of the dubbing (color, density) and underlying thread color. The process allows the tyer to tailor their patterns to match the color and size of the insect they are targeting.

The magic with flymphs happens when they are fished. When the fly gets wet, the underlying silk core becomes visible thru the spiky dubbing of the body. This color of the silk can be an important part of the overall appearance of the fly.

IMO flymphs can have tails, or be tail-less. They may be single color, or multiple colors. Some tyers keep the hackle at the front of the thorax, while others spiral the hackle thru the thorax region.

I would recommend picking up a copy of the "Art of the Wet Fly" (Leisenring/Hidy), and searching thru this site, and Carl Sanders (Old Hat) website.
According to your definition, I have never tied an actual Flymph in 40 years of tying. And that's ok.
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Roadkill
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Re: Flymphs

Post by Roadkill » Fri Jul 19, 2019 5:49 pm

raven4ns

Also take a look at this site for more understanding of the Flymph...
http://www.flymph.com/html/literature.html
ronr
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Re: Flymphs

Post by ronr » Fri Jul 19, 2019 6:32 pm

raven4ns... welcome.. I'm a relative newcomer to this forum, but have become addicted to the site. There is a wealth of information available from the most knowledgable group of tyers I've ever encountered. They are also quick to share their expertise and often, even their materials. Spend some time exploring the various subjects in the forums and get ready to find more patterns, video how to's, reference materials, reading lists, and hours to spend exploring the world of flymphs and soft hackles...
If you get the chance to join one of the fly swaps, I'd strongly urge you to participate. I've done so and been rewarded with great flies and good advice on tying.
Hope you find tying and fishing flymphs as much fun as I have.
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hankaye
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Re: Flymphs

Post by hankaye » Sat Jul 20, 2019 10:14 am

raven4ns, Howdy;

What is a Flymph? Ok, I googled definition of a Flymph, found the link below.
It's interesting on several levels as it is a forum page that has responses from
several active members from this forum as well as the originator whose post
is at the bottom of the page and gives the definition of a Flymph. There are
also mentioned a few ways to fish them.
https://www.sparsegreymatter.com/viewtopic.php?t=1689

Hope this helps some.

hank
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of consecutive days I've stayed alive." George Carlin
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SenecaLaker
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Re: Flymphs

Post by SenecaLaker » Sat Jul 20, 2019 10:56 am

Thanks for that post Hank!!
Dave
raven4ns
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Re: Flymphs

Post by raven4ns » Sat Jul 20, 2019 1:20 pm

Thank you, Hank, for the help.

hankaye wrote:
Sat Jul 20, 2019 10:14 am
raven4ns, Howdy;

What is a Flymph? Ok, I googled definition of a Flymph, found the link below.
It's interesting on several levels as it is a forum page that has responses from
several active members from this forum as well as the originator whose post
is at the bottom of the page and gives the definition of a Flymph. There are
also mentioned a few ways to fish them.
https://www.sparsegreymatter.com/viewtopic.php?t=1689

Hope this helps some.

hank
All the best,

Tim
https://www.flickr.com/photos/44673530@N04/
The measure of a man is not how many times he gets knocked down, but how many times he gets back up.
raven4ns
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Joined: Sun Mar 31, 2013 11:45 am
Location: Dartmouth, NS, Canada
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Re: Flymphs

Post by raven4ns » Sat Jul 20, 2019 1:22 pm

Thank you everyone for your responses. I appreciate the help in understanding Flymph's.
All the best,

Tim
https://www.flickr.com/photos/44673530@N04/
The measure of a man is not how many times he gets knocked down, but how many times he gets back up.
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