Breadcrust and Dun 1550

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William Anderson
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Breadcrust and Dun 1550

Post by William Anderson » Mon Mar 28, 2011 10:03 am

Inspired by Fishhead's last couple of patterns, I looked around to find a way to use this technique. I know there is an old pattern called the breadcrust and it may have been a dry fly...I could have looked it up but didn't. This body is pretty soft, but suggestively caddis like.

Daiichi 1550
Gray 14/0
previously overlooked phasant lower body feather as the body
and dun hen hackle.

Image

w
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Re: Breadcrust and Dun 1550

Post by Old Hat » Mon Mar 28, 2011 10:32 am

Wonderfully executed. A couple tail fibers and I know just the hatch to use that pattern for. The technique has great promise in getting a profile that is well matched. Will have to tie some of those up.
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Re: Breadcrust and Dun 1550

Post by tie2fish » Mon Mar 28, 2011 12:10 pm

There are several things I really like about this dressing, not the least of which is the way the colors blend together to create something very natural.
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Re: Breadcrust and Dun 1550

Post by fishhead » Mon Mar 28, 2011 2:29 pm

very nice, I like the dun hackle it blends very nicely
DUBBN

Re: Breadcrust and Dun 1550

Post by DUBBN » Mon Mar 28, 2011 2:32 pm

Breadcrust: I stopped tying them. I thought it was a waste of grouse.
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Re: Breadcrust and Dun 1550

Post by William Anderson » Mon Mar 28, 2011 3:32 pm

Dubbn, nice link. That is a far cry from what I've put together, although it is a soft-hackle pattern. I would understand if you were using some of the premium feathers from the grouse, but that one looks like more stem than feather, and i would assume it would be one of the more marginal feathers. I always hate the capes where the 12-10 feathers are used up, or I'm missing the best feathers from a wing shoulder. I dont' get rid of the cape, what if I take up bass fishing at some point, or need them for tailing or streamers. But honestly, what am I going to do with capes that are missing that band of feathers across the top of the cape? The pheasant feather I used was one that I never invisioned having any use for...but there it was, and what the hell?

Does anyone here fish the Breadcrust pattern? Know more about it?

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Re: Breadcrust and Dun 1550

Post by DUBBN » Mon Mar 28, 2011 4:47 pm

Years ago the Breadcrust was the "go to" pattern on the Roaring Fork here in Colorado. When I say years, I mean approximately 30. I didnt try to tie it as I had no idea where to find, or what the hell a Ruffed Grouse was. I would look at the Breadcrust pattern any time I was in a RF Valley flyshop. I tryed to copy it using Rooster hackle palmered, them trimmed short. I developed a little cased caddis pattern that served me well for quite a few years. For the life of me, I cant figure out why I stopped tyeing that pattern.

A few years ago, a friend sent me some Ruffed Grouse skins. I set out splitting the quill and and extracting the pith. I think it's easyer to find urine stained fur from a vixen fox than it is getting that dang pith out. I think I ended up tying two Breadcrust flys. I also thought to myself. Self, in the time it took to prep those feathers, and tie that fly you could have had 2 dozen Hares Ears nymphs tyed.

If tying two flys makes me an expert, then by all means call me "Professor".

Mr. Anderson. You and a few other tyers on this board have some mad tying skills and it is a pleasure to see your creations. The Breadcrust and Dun is a gorgeous fly, and in my opinion, looks better than the fly in the link that I posted. Very well done and my hat is off to you on your original use of material.
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Re: Breadcrust and Dun 1550

Post by William Anderson » Mon Mar 28, 2011 8:45 pm

Well, Professor, I was admiring the flies tied by fishhead and I vaguely remembered seeing the breadcrust years ago, thinking it was tied more like what I show in this post. It's fun to throw something out there, and I like this pattern too. Thanks for all the background on the breadcrust and for the kind words. It has been a great past few months seeing all the patterns from some very talented tiers coming up everyday.

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Re: Breadcrust and Dun 1550

Post by Soft-hackle » Mon Mar 28, 2011 8:57 pm

I like your result, William. Very nice variation. The original pattern was classified, originally as a nymph. I'd say a wingless wet fly for sure.

http://www.flymphforum.com/viewtopic.ph ... 3&p=65#p65

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Re: Breadcrust and Dun 1550

Post by willowhead » Mon Mar 28, 2011 11:33 pm

That's a sweet version......... ;)
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