Ray's Silk-Bodied Caddis/Green Sedge/Rockworm (Tutorial/SBS)

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Ray's Silk-Bodied Caddis/Green Sedge/Rockworm (Tutorial/SBS)

Post by letumgo » Sun Apr 17, 2011 7:19 pm

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Green Silk Caddis
Hook - Mustad Model C49S/Sizes 10 & 12
Thread - Pearsall's Gossamer Silk (Green / No 18)
Hackle - Indian Hen Saddle (Natural Mottled Brown)
Back - Five or Six Strands of Peacock Herl
Body - Pearsall's Marabou Silk (Green / No 18) - Split a silk into individual strands and recombine before wrapping to get a smoother body
Rib - Dubbing Loop created from the long tag end of the tying silk
Abdomen - Peacock Herl reinforces in a silk dubbing loop

I have continued to "massage" this rock worm pattern. This version is tyed with traditional materials (Pearsall's Gossamer & Marabou silk; peacock herl; hen saddle hackle). I've tyed a number of different versions the past couple days and this is the version that makes me happy.

Detailed Tying Instructions:
1) Mount hook in vice

2) Mount your tying thread with five thigh wraps, just behind the eye of the hook. Leave a 6" to 8" long tag end which will be used later on to form the rib of the fly.

3) Prepare an Indian hen hackle by striping the fluff off the base of the feather. Tye it in by the stem, with the feather facing out over the eye of the hook (good side should be facing you). You only need to make four or five tight wraps to secure the feather in place. Break off the seam of the feather by pulling sharply, while holding pressure on your tying thread (saves time).

4) Prepare the peacock herl by lining up the strands with the tips all even. Trim off the thin tips (cut off roughly 2") and tye them in along the top of the hook. Stop wrapping after you have made about ten (10) wraps.

5) Prepare the marabou silk by cutting off a strand roughly 10" long. Untwist the strands until they start to come apart. Using the tip of your scissors, split to strand apart into the individual strands. Eventually you should end up with roughly ten (10) fine silk strands. Recombine the strands and even the ends by trimming off roughly 1/2". Tye the silk strands in along the top of the peacock herl, which is also at the top of the hook. While holding tension on the peacock herl and strands of marabou silk, continue wrapping the tying thread until you get past the barb of the hook.

6) Fold the long tag end of the tying silk (from step 2), and tye it in by the end, to form a dubbing loop. Leave this dubbing loop hanging off the back of the fly, to be used in a later step. Wrap the tying silk back to the front of the hook and stop where you want the thorax to begin. Make sure that your wraps are in closely touching turns.

7) Grasp the marabou silk strands and stroke the silk to smooth and align the fibers. Wrap the marabou silk strands forward to form the abdomen of the fly. You can adjust the taper of the body by making closer wraps (thicker) or by wrapping forwards and backwards over the body a couple times. Once you get to the tying thread, secure it in place with three or four wraps and trim off the excess.

8) Gently grasp the strands of peacock herl and pull them over the back of the fly. Make two loose wraps to hold the herl in place. DO NOT TRIM OFF THE ENDS - They will be used later.

9) Insert a dubbing hook into the dubbing loop (from step 6) and twist it into a tight strand. This will form the rib of the fly, which is used to reinforce the peacock herl and segment the body.

10) Wind the rib forward in open loops. Use your off hand to hold the peacock herl in place, while wrapping the rib. Otherwise it slips off the back.

11) Secure the rib with a few wraps of the tying silk. DO NOT TRIM OFF THE EXCESS DUBBING LOOP - It will be used in a minute to reinforce the peacock herl thorax.

12) Wrap the tying thread forward to the eye of the hook. Leave enough room for the head of the fly.

13) Untwist the dubbing loop and then insert the peacock herl. Retwist into a silk/herl chenille and wrap forward, forming the thorax of the fly. Secure with a couple tight wraps and trim off the excess herl.

14) Grasp the tip of the hackle in a rotary hackle pliers and fold the hackle (all of the hackle fibers should be coming off one side of the hackle stem). Make two wraps of hackle back towards the thorax of the fly. Secure with the tying thread and trim off the excess hackle.

15) Whip finish a neat head and trim off the tying silk.
Ray (letumgo)----<°))))))><
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"Casting a fly rod in these tight quarters takes patience (swearing quietly to one’s self also helps)."
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Re: Ray's Silk-Bodied Caddis (Green Sedge/Rockworm)

Post by willowhead » Sun Apr 17, 2011 7:22 pm

Cool fly..............Cool instructions..........you keep "massagin'" that puppy.....we're gonna have to call the vice squad :D
Learn to see with your ears and hear with your eyes
CAUSE, it don't mean a thing, if it aint got that swing.....

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Re: Ray's Silk-Bodied Caddis (Green Sedge/Rockworm)

Post by CreationBear » Sun Apr 17, 2011 7:30 pm

Amazing how much more refined this version is, though I'll be curious if you get the same contrast between the peacock and body once the silk wets through as you did with the antron and wire editions.

Speaking of silk: can you work with Pearsall's Stout the way you're doing with the Marabou here? I've been looking for some purple silk floss, but the vendor I was going to use only had that color in the thicker version.
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Re: Ray's Silk-Bodied Caddis (Green Sedge/Rockworm)

Post by tjd » Sun Apr 17, 2011 7:50 pm

Ray,

That's a great looking fly. It reminds me of the old Trueblood Caddis, which had a silver rib.

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Best,

Tim

Photos and Pattern Listings by Normand Frechette

Trueblood's Caddis (original recipe/"Popular Fly Patterns" by Terry Hellekson)
Hook: Mustad 7957BX, size 8-12
Thread: Black
Tail: Green floss
Shellback: Peacock herl
Ribbing: Fine oval silver tinsel
Body: Green floss tied fat or slim
Legs: Mallard fibers

Trueblood's Caddis Variation (by Normand Freshette)
hook : nymph style in your favorite sizes
thread : black
tail : green uni-stretch
shellback : pheasant tail
ribbing : silver wire
body : green uni-stretch
legs : mallard fibers
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Re: Ray's Silk-Bodied Caddis (Green Sedge/Rockworm)

Post by letumgo » Sun Apr 17, 2011 8:53 pm

CreationBear - To answer your question, yes, the Pearsall's Stout silk would work nicely. Actually, it will work even better than the Marabou silk because you will not need to mess around splitting the silk strands. The Stout silk comes straight (untwisted), so you can just cut a section off the spool and start tying with it. I really like using the Pearsall's Stout.

You were right about the color. I dunked the silk version in a cup of water and took a couple new photos (see new photos below). The pattern looks considerably darker like once it is wet. It was interesting to see the change in the color of the peacock herl. I had used some peacock herl which had been dyed orange. When it was dry, the peacock herl did not look particularly orange. The herl looks much more orange once it go wet.

Tim - I am not familiar with the "Trueblood Caddis".

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"Casting a fly rod in these tight quarters takes patience (swearing quietly to one’s self also helps)."
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Re: Ray's Silk-Bodied Caddis (Green Sedge/Rockworm)

Post by hankaye » Sun Apr 17, 2011 9:00 pm

Ray, Howdy;

You massage that any more and you'll be lookin to fish for whales... :oops: :lol:

Like the joke about the guy that had a wallet made from the fore-skin from an elephant...
if he rubbed it to hard it would grow into a steamer trunk ................. :lol:

Thanks for the detailed instructions. Everytime you be so kind they get copied and stuck into
a filefolder I'm building...

Thanks Bud...

hank
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"Every day I beat my own previous record for number
of consecutive days I've stayed alive." George Carlin
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Re: Ray's Silk-Bodied Caddis (Green Sedge/Rockworm)

Post by letumgo » Sun Apr 17, 2011 9:06 pm

No that is FUNNY!!! :lol:

Hank - Once again, you have made me laugh out loud! You have a great sense of humor.
Ray (letumgo)----<°))))))><
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"Casting a fly rod in these tight quarters takes patience (swearing quietly to one’s self also helps)."
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Re: Ray's Silk-Bodied Caddis (Green Sedge/Rockworm)

Post by Ruard » Mon Apr 18, 2011 1:12 am

Beautiful fly and I like the wetphoto's very much, thank you!!

Greeting
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Re: Ray's Silk-Bodied Caddis (Green Sedge/Rockworm)

Post by CreationBear » Mon Apr 18, 2011 7:46 am

Ray-- thanks for the info on the Pearsall's stout; btw, I'm loving the orange peacock herl...I wonder if it retains the "magic" UV qualities the original is supposed to have?
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Re: Ray's Silk-Bodied Caddis (Green Sedge/Rockworm)

Post by William Anderson » Mon Apr 18, 2011 8:58 am

Ray, these are fantastic. I like the evolution of this and the wet shots are to see. I have some ideas for this bug, but I'll have to get home to give it a try. I much prefer this silk version.

w
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