Ostrich and Primrose Kebari & Underwater Photos

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REE04419
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Re: Ostrich and Primrose Kebari & Underwater Photos

Post by REE04419 » Mon Dec 31, 2018 11:15 am

Wow! Gorgeous fly, Ray. Superb tying, as always. Is this your own pattern? Can't get over how fishy that looks.
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letumgo
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Re: Ostrich and Primrose Kebari & Underwater Photos

Post by letumgo » Mon Dec 31, 2018 11:31 am

Ron,

Yes, this is one of my patterns. All part of my ongoing experimentational approach to fly tying/fishing. For me, there is great joy in discovery. How will the fly behave, appear and fish. I became especially interested in the behaviour of Tenkara flies, and how the hackle interacts with the surface film.

Once the hackle fibers become fully wetted, the surface film holds onto the fibers, bending them and holding them to the surface. Once below the surface, the fibers take on their natural splayed appearance, moving with any micro currents buffeting the fly. But near the surface film, the hackle fibers are spread out flat under the waters surface.

I was surprised to find that ostrich herl holds onto a lot of air, giving it a silvery appearance, sort of like CDC fibers.
Ray (letumgo)----<°))))))><
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"Casting a fly rod in these tight quarters takes patience (swearing quietly to ones self helps too)."
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Re: Ostrich and Primrose Kebari & Underwater Photos

Post by ForumGhillie » Mon Dec 31, 2018 1:45 pm

letumgo wrote:
Mon Dec 31, 2018 11:11 am
John,

Thank you for posting the video. I just sat and watched the whole thing. Very interesting perspective, and one that I will be thinking about more during the next season fishing. The video shares many good lessons, with examples to illustrate the key ideas.

As I was watching the video, I noted that much of the video material is focuses on the view towards the surface film, and beyond, which seemed somewhat focused towards dry fly fishing perspective. Subsurface flies can be viewed directly by the fish, which would change the clarity in which the fish can see the fly, and the duration of time the fly can be examined by the fish. I am left wondering if the better view and longer inspection time, makes subsurface flies more challenging.

In other words, the dry fly floats into a narrow field of view, with a brief time for the fish to decide (eat/reject), resulting in rather impulsive feeding choices. A subsurface fly is more clearly visible, for a longer period, perhaps allowing fish to be more discriminating/selective.

Anyway, fun to think about, and speculate on. Thanks for the link. Really enjoyed going below the surface. :D ;)
Ray,

Some thoughts...

If I had you stand next to two conveyor belts one on each side of you that are moving a 2-3 feet per second. The conveyor belts are loaded with all kinds of crap and intermixed with all the junk are some small pieces of food. They are also all close to the same color, crap and food. You have to decide in a split second what is edible and what is not.

I have often said if I trout could think like us they would probably starve. IMHO, we way over think things, including myself.

We don't know how a trout process things in it's brain, but I personally believe movement is a key trigger, even subtle movements like gills.

John
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Re: Ostrich and Primrose Kebari & Underwater Photos

Post by hankaye » Mon Dec 31, 2018 11:36 pm

ForumGhillie, howdy;

John, I can appreciate your point-of-view, however have you seen any video
of the folks sorting materials on a conveyor at a waste site?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yzox7nuzaZk
I don't really think the streams are that full of objects for the fishes to
sort through. In the videos the humans are doing a very good job of sorting
the non-recyclables form the recyclables and the belts are moving at about
3-5 feet/sec. don't ya think?

hank
Striving for a less complicated life since 1949...
"Every day I beat my own previous record for number
of consecutive days I've stayed alive." George Carlin
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Re: Ostrich and Primrose Kebari & Underwater Photos

Post by ForumGhillie » Tue Jan 01, 2019 7:38 am

Hank,

Okay, bad example, but I bet they miss a lot crap on the conveyor belt. :-)
I don't really think the streams are that full of objects for the fishes to
sort through.
You would be amazed all the debris, etc. in the drift in a freestone stream, such as the Namekagon River or Madison River. When I used to keep a couple of trout I found pine needles and other debris in trout.

I have been doing some underwater videos lately and I amazed what looks like clearwater is not. I know my video camera is not close to interpreting what a trout's eye sees or how a trout's brain interprets what it's eyes see. None the less, to have to find food with so many distractions from above, below, sides, in front, bouncing light rays, the mirror effect, etc. that takes a creature well adapted to it's environment, which we do not really understand.

This year I plan on videoing various hackled fly patterns in the freestone stream drift to see how the various feathers move - starling, partridge, etc. Although, I will never know how a trout's brain really interprets our fly patterns. It I just for fun.

John
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