The across and down cast and the slow dragging fly.

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Randyflycaster
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The across and down cast and the slow dragging fly.

Post by Randyflycaster » Wed Aug 13, 2014 4:25 pm

I'm reading Leonard Wright's book, Fishing the Dry Fly as a Living Insect. In it he writes (page 100 in my edition) of the across and downstream cast:

"...Then too, since the delivery is made in a generally downstream direction, the imitation will be fishing slower, instead of faster, than the current flow. ... A wet fly or nymph traveling faster than the current is doomed to failure except, perhaps, under nearly still-water conditions."

First question: Why does a fly, after being cast across and down, always drift downstream traveling slower than the current? (Supposing there fast water close to the angler and slower water farther out, where the fly is? Wouldn't the fly then drift faster than the current?)

Second question: Why is a wet fly or nymph traveling faster than the current doomed to failure, while one drifting slower than the current is not? After all, some nymphs swim or crawl. Might they move slightly faster than the current?

Thanks,

Randy
DUBBN

Re: The across and down cast and the slow dragging fly.

Post by DUBBN » Wed Aug 13, 2014 4:38 pm

Randyflycaster wrote: First question: Why does a fly, after being cast across and down, always drift downstream traveling slower than the current? (Supposing there fast water close to the angler and slower water farther out, where the fly is? Wouldn't the fly then drift faster than the current?)

Second question: Why is a wet fly or nymph traveling faster than the current doomed to failure, while one drifting slower than the current is not? After all, some nymphs swim or crawl. Might they move slightly faster than the current?

Thanks,

Randy
1st question. A fly does not always float slower on a down and across. Without an upstream mend, the current/currents will push into the belly of the fly line making it float faster.

2nd question. At times the trout will prefer the fly to emerge faster than the current. It is up to you as the fisherman to decide when you will stop mending, and allow the pattern to swing to the top of the water column, and at what speed. Caddis activity can cause trout to chase flies even if the pattern is floating faster than the current.
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Re: The across and down cast and the slow dragging fly.

Post by redietz » Wed Aug 13, 2014 7:17 pm

I think Wayne's exactly right.

I'm a fan of Leonard Wright and really like the way he thought outside the box, but there are times when he was just blowing smoke. This is one of the times.
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Re: The across and down cast and the slow dragging fly.

Post by Mataura mayfly » Wed Aug 13, 2014 8:50 pm

Randy, I agree with above.
Gain basic principals and theory from your readings, but never believe each "lesson" to be the be all and end all answer.
As you point out, each piece of moving water you visit may vary, weight and bulk of the fly (or flies) will cause differing "swim" speeds, each individual has their own method and ways of casting and controlling the line on the water- each of these can have a direct bearing on how the fly behaves in relation to the water speed and current- plus a thousand other "variables".
Mr Wright's math may ring true if you fish a short, straight, taunt line on small streams, but in my way of thinking and for my local waters, Wayne's advice works better.
"Listen to the sound of the river and you will get a trout".... Irish proverb.
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Re: The across and down cast and the slow dragging fly.

Post by Randyflycaster » Thu Aug 14, 2014 7:44 am

Folks,

Some good thoughts. Thanks so much,

Randy
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Re: The across and down cast and the slow dragging fly.

Post by Old Hat » Thu Aug 21, 2014 7:27 pm

Also, we often get caught thinking of stream velocity by only what we can see. There are differing current speeds vertically in the column as well. I don't think Wrights blowing smoke just not including all the variables. In an even current, with A downstream presentation the fly will be slower just because of the drag of the line. However an even current across and vertically is very rare, so as others have said his information isn't really of much practical use. But, a good concept to understand.
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Re: The across and down cast and the slow dragging fly.

Post by redietz » Thu Aug 21, 2014 7:41 pm

Carl --

When I said blowing smoke, I was referring to this:
A wet fly or nymph traveling faster than the current is doomed to failure
A lot of Euro-nymphers would disagree.
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Re: The across and down cast and the slow dragging fly.

Post by Old Hat » Thu Aug 21, 2014 11:46 pm

I was thinking the same about Euro-nymphing when I read that as well.
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